Business braces for impact as Jakarta heads into second lockdown

JAKARTA, Sept 14 (Reuters) – The markings of a rollercoaster year are plastered over Sutiwet’s small Jakarta restaurant – plastic barriers on the counters, stickers on the glass urging customers to wear masks, and a gallon of water out front for people to wash their hands.

But just as life in the Indonesian capital was starting to return to normal, the city’s 10 million residents are heading into partial lockdown for the second time.

Jakarta’s tightened social restrictions, effective from Monday for two weeks, mean businesses, malls and houses of worship can only operate at limited capacity, while dining in at restaurants and cafes is not allowed.

Small business owners such as Sutiwet, who like many Indonesians goes by only one name, are bracing themselves for the economic impact.

“We almost managed to survive the first round of large-scale social restrictions, and here comes another one,” Sutiwet, 45, told Reuters.

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