Tag: isnt

Why Your Incentive Plan Isn’t Working

Right now, believe it or not, is a good time to evaluate your incentive plan and re-do it if necessary. The reason is simple. The economy is in turmoil, with plenty of companies facing unprecedented challenges. Now more than ever, you need to attract and keep good people and get everyone focused on business results. An effective incentive plan helps you accomplish both objectives.

Trouble is, most incentive plans don’t do the work they should. Some aren’t transparent, meaning that employees cross their fingers for a bonus but don’t see how to generate one. Some aren’t tied to business performance, so owners wind up rewarding employees without seeing improved financial results. We’ve evaluated hundreds of such plans, and we’ve seen the same mistakes crop up again and again.

Mistake #1 is offering a bonus for business as usual. That’s an appropriate role for annual profit sharing–it’s always good to give

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Trump says insulin is so cheap, it’s ‘like water.’ It isn’t

There was much to dislike in this week’s presidential debate — the lies, the rudeness, the inability of the White House incumbent to rise above the level of a cranky kindergartner.

For me, the low point came not when President Trump refused to condemn white supremacy, and not when he tore into the sons of Democratic candidate Joe Biden, but when he once again sought to convince the American people that he had single-handedly lowered the cost of prescription drugs.

Trump claimed that drug prices “will be coming down 80% or 90%” thanks to him.

He claimed that a series of executive orders have forced pharmaceutical companies to slash prices.

And the one that floored me: Trump claimed that the cost of insulin is now so low, it’s practically free.

“I’m getting it for so cheap, it’s like water,” he said. “You want to know the truth? So cheap.”

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The MBA Isn’t The Only Hot Business Degree Right Now

Applications to the world’s top MBA programs look set to reach record levels over the next year, with many schools already reporting double-digit growth as they extended final round deadlines in the spring and summer. Wharton has seen a 21% increase for the incoming class, making it the largest entering cohort in the school’s history. And, after pushing its final application deadline back by a whole 51 days, Columbia has reported an increase of 18%, breaking a two-year slide in applications. Looking beyond the U.S., INSEAD saw a 57% jump in R2 applications back in May 2020, while Switzerland’s IMD Business School extended its own application deadline for the January 2021 intake with the intention of enrolling its largest ever MBA class.

While there’s no doubt that an MBA from one of the world’s top business schools is in high demand right now, it’s not the only graduate business degree

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Trump says insulin is now so cheap, it’s ‘like water.’ It isn’t



a hand holding a bottle: President Trump made a number of claims about lowering drug prices during his debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden. Most were untrue. (Arkasha Stevenson / Los Angeles Times)


© ( Los Angeles Times)
President Trump made a number of claims about lowering drug prices during his debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden. Most were untrue. (Arkasha Stevenson / Los Angeles Times)

There was much to dislike in this week’s presidential debate — the lies, the rudeness, the inability of the White House incumbent to rise above the level of a cranky kindergartner.

For me, the low point came not when President Trump refused to condemn white supremacy, and not when he tore into the sons of Democratic candidate Joe Biden, but when he once again sought to convince the American people that he had single-handedly lowered the cost of prescription drugs.

Trump claimed that drug prices “will be coming down 80% or 90%” thanks to him.

He claimed that a series of executive orders have forced pharmaceutical companies to slash prices.

And the one that floored me:

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Restaurants prepare for days when outdoor dining isn’t so fresco

Instead, Gouvia is focused on making the interior experience as comfortable and safe as possible for guests. He said patrons were slow to return when the restaurant first reopened in July, but he’s seen an uptick in recent weeks as customers’ comfort level increased.

“As time went by, I think people got more comfortable when they saw what we’re doing to create separation with plexiglass shields on the tables, as well as demanding you wear the mask,” Gouvia said.

Kristin Jonna, owner of Vinotecca in Birmingham and Vinology in Ann Arbor, is also not keen on the concept of winterizing patio space. “Once you tent a space and then bring heaters in, you’re basically creating a COVID incubator,” Jonna said. “It’s an issue of public safety. I think it’s a very poor idea because there’s no ventilation in a tent like that. I just can’t do that in good faith.”

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Apple reverses decision to charge businesses fees for events, but Facebook still isn’t happy

  • Facebook said Apple temporarily reversed its decision to take a 30% cut of sales from businesses hosting paid events through Facebook.
  • Previously, Facebook said Apple blocked an update to the Facebook app that displayed a message saying Apple would take a cut of the transactions.
  • Apple’s reversal only lasts for three months, and does not apply to gaming companies hosting paid events, Facebook said.



Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 23, 2019.


© Provided by CNBC
Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 23, 2019.

Facebook on Friday said Apple temporarily reversed its decision to take a 30% cut of transactions generated by small businesses hosting paid virtual events through the Facebook app. But although it’s a temporary win for Facebook, the company still used the opportunity to frame Apple’s App Store rules as harmful to small businesses during the Covid-19 pandemic and global recession.

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Apple’s

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When Business as Usual Isn’t Working, Look to Nonprofits for Inspiration

Executive Summary

The business world can learn a lot from nonprofits, especially in a moment when it’s being asked to be more inclusive, more considerate of social impact, and to make do with fewer resources. There are three interrelated strategies that are relevant to businesses seeking to add societal value in the Covid era: 1) pursue intermediate goals; 2) embrace seemingly contradictory tensions; and 3) do more with less. The Christian Medical College (CMC) Hospital in Vellore, India, is a good model for how to put the ideas into practice. To achieve its longterm goal of better health care outcomes, CMC pursued an intermediate jobs program that dealt with people’s immediate felt need — more stable income — and built trust with the hospital. While CMC’s goal of providing high-quality care to low-income patients seems contradictory, its good reputation allowed it to charge wealthier patients more and subsidize those in

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Hollywood’s Online Movie Experiment Isn’t Paying Off

Richard Lorber shifted his movie business to the internet as soon as movie theaters closed across the United States. Lorber runs Kino Lorber, one of the leading distributors of independent and foreign films.

Sales surged at first, prompting most of his competitors and partners to join the movement.

Everyone from independent distributors to the biggest movie studios in the world has tried what’s called premium video-on-demand, releasing a new movie at home for a higher price than your average iTunes rental. Examples include “Trolls: World Tour,” “Bacurau” and, most recently, “Mulan.”

But like so many activities that seemed so great at the beginning of the pandemic – baking bread, virtual concerts and Zoom meetings – the novelty has worn off. Kino Lorber’s sales have slipped at least 30% since the beginning of the pandemic.

“Digital box office revenues are lower than they were in the early stages,”  Lorber told me.

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Tonal, the Peloton for strength training, isn’t worried about Apple’s fitness play

Tonal — a startup sometimes referred to as the Peloton of at-home strength training — has raised a fresh $110 million of funding to boost its expansion in the crowded home fitness space. And before you ask: Its CEO isn’t worried competition from Apple’s newly announced fitness service.



a woman standing in a room


© Tonal


Tonal, whose product mounts to the wall like a flat screen television and uses “digital weights” where the resistance is personalized, announced Thursday new financing for marketing initiatives and scaling its supply chain and logistics to meet demand. With the new funding, the company has raised $200 million to date and said its current valuation is more than $500 million.

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Investors in the round include L Catterton, a private equity firm which has backed a range of consumer startups, as well as the Amazon’s Alexa Fund and several athletes, including Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors.

The

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Bytedance’s TikTok proposal isn’t just up to Trump

ByteDance, the world’s most valuable start-up, warned on Thursday that its proposal to seal a partnership — rather than an outright sale — between TikTok US and computing tech giant Oracle (ORCL) will ultimately need approval from both China and US officials.

ByteDance, valued at $78bn (£61bn), only launched video sharing app TikTok in September 2016 but, outside China, it has already amassed 300 million active users and 1.4 billion total installs to date. TikTok has been downloaded 175 million times in the US alone.

On 14 September, Oracle confirmed in a statement that it had won the bid for TikTok US over Microsoft (MSFT) as a “trusted technology provider.” 

While exact details of the deal have not been confirmed publicly, a range of media reports say the proposal completely avoids the outright sale of the US arm of the social video platform giant and that ByteDance will keep a

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