Tag: Daily

Charles Schwab Recognized as Most Trusted Online Broker by Investor’s Business Daily

Charles Schwab has earned the highest ranking in Investor’s Business Daily’s Most Trusted Financial Companies study, with a trust rating of 92.3. In addition to being ranked the No. 1 overall most trusted financial company and No. 1 in the online broker category, Schwab was also ranked No. 1 for fair pricing and fees, customer service, and customer treatment within the online broker category. Schwab also ranked No. 2 in the wealth management category, with a trust rating of 89.2.

“We are honored that our clients, employees, and communities place such high trust in us every day,” said Walt Bettinger, president and CEO of Charles Schwab. “At Schwab, we look at the world Through Clients’ Eyes and keep that perspective at the heart of everything we do. We are committed to earning the trust and loyalty of those we serve by focusing on our ‘no trade-offs’ approach – delivering a

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The Daily 202: Trump tries frantically to make up lost ground with seniors, promising free medicine and checks

Other polls released over the last week show Biden leading among voters 65 and older, including in the battlegrounds of Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Pew’s survey was in the field from Wednesday, the day after the first presidential debate, through Monday, the day Trump checked himself out of Walter Reed after his three-night stay in the hospital. Pew’s unusually large sample size of 10,543 registered voters means smaller margins of error for subgroups, which allows for deeper analysis.

Trump and many of his top advisers see his weakness among seniors as an existential threat to his hopes for a second term, and the president is demanding that his aides use all the levers of the federal government to woo older voters who have drifted away during the final 25 days of the campaign.

The president tweeted a two-and-a-half minute video Thursday afternoon of himself speaking directly to seniors, whom

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Coeur d’Alene students will go to school daily starting Oct. 5

Masks are still required on school property and buses in Coeur d’Alene, and students are expected to maintain physical distance as much as possible.

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho — Students in the Coeur d’Alene School District will attend in-person classes five days a week beginning Monday, Oct. 5. 

The district’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously on Friday morning to switch from the current orange (moderate) risk level, which calls for a hybrid model of virtual and in-person learning, to the yellow (minimal) risk level after reviewing data trends on COVID-19 cases in Kootenai County. 

When the district operates in yellow, all students —  except those enrolled in online school — will attend school in-person every day.  

In a special meeting on Monday, Sept. 28, the Post Falls School District’s Board of Trustees voted to hold off on moving to all in-person learning. 

RELATED: Coeur d’Alene will move to all in-person classes,

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The Daily 202: Trump’s $750 tax bill helps Biden sharpen pitch to working-class Whites who defected to GOP in 2016

“We’re picking up an awful lot of the folks who used to be Democrats. They’re coming back home,” Biden told a small group of reporters. “They know they’ve been screwed by Trump, but also they’re not sure that there’s the old Democratic Party back looking at them, listening to them, and so I think it’s important.”

Biden made these comments at John Murtha Airport. Murtha, very much a creature of that “old Democratic Party,” represented Johnstown in Congress from 1974 until his death in 2010. The area’s realignment toward the GOP has accelerated during the intervening decade.

In 2016, Trump carried Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan by less than one percentage point each. All three states had voted for every Democratic presidential nominee in the previous six elections, including the two in which Biden was the vice-presidential nominee, before flipping to Trump. A key factor was that the president really ran

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The daily business briefing: October 1, 2020



a small airplane sitting on the tarmac of an airport runway: American Airlines planes


© Scott Olson/Getty Images
American Airlines planes

1.

President Trump early Thursday signed a bill keeping the government funded through Dec. 11, avoiding a partial government shutdown. The bill became law after a midnight deadline, but no government operations were expected to be disrupted. The bipartisan bill was quickly approved by the Senate after receiving White House approval last week. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin failed to reach a compromise on another key spending bill — the new coronavirus relief package. Pelosi and Mnuchin met Wednesday and plan to continue discussions. House Democrats postponed a Wednesday vote on their $2.2 trillion proposal to allow more time for negotiations. Republicans want to spend less but vulnerable lawmakers from both parties are pushing for a deal before Election Day. [CNBC, CNN]

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American and United airlines on Thursday will move forward with plans

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Daily Malong Empowers Weavers and Artisans in the Philippines to Keep Their Traditions for the Next Generation

Press release content from Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

SAN FRANCISCO – September 30, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

​​Founded in 2017 by dance and music artist Lydia Querian, Daily Malong is on a mission to empower weavers, master artists and other Indigenous community leaders in the Philippines to continue their living traditions by extending appreciation of indigenous creations to Filipino diasporic communities in North America. 

“Many youths in weaving communities are assigning more value to Western culture than their own traditions. We believe that by demonstrating how much people in the Filipino diaspora appreciate their culture and work, it will encourage these youth to take a more active role in perpetuating the traditions, practice them with pride, and value their communities.” Lydia Querian, Founder.

“Most of my customers are either Filipino folk dancers/musicians, cultural practitioners, young professionals, recent college

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Tiverton business owner named R.I. Entrepreneur of the Year – News – MetroWest Daily News, Framingham, MA

In 1990, Kaitlyn Szczupak’s father Scott opened a transmission and general auto repair facility in Portsmouth called S&S Transmissions and Auto Repair.

Growing up in the business, she was in awe of her father’s ability to fix things that were broken and how he made something useful out of something that came into the shop useless.

Kaitlyn fell in love with the automotive industry and, soon after graduating high school, sat down with her parents to discuss her ambitions in life — she wanted to take over the family-business one day.

To ensure she was prepared, Szczupak decided to obtain her degree in business management with a focus on small business. She spent her hours away from school at her father’s shop to gain insight into operating an automotive facility.

In February 2016, Kaitlyn’s father died unexpectedly, leaving the family devastated. Gone was her father and mentor. Gone was her

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These software developers ditched the daily stand-up. It was a good idea

Software company Haystack wanted to see how it could address burnout amongst its team.

Very few people enjoy meetings, and many will agree that constantly being pulled into huddles and stand-ups just takes valuable time away from actually getting stuff done.

The coronavirus pandemic has added another layer to this issue. While
video-conferencing tools

have created a means for us to stay in touch with our colleagues, organizations are still struggling to find a balance, leading to the rise of a new phenomenon informally dubbed
“Zoom fatigue”

.

SEE: COVID-19 workplace policy (TechRepublic Premium)

Software company Haystack recently found itself experiencing this first-hand. At the beginning of the March, the company appeared to be cruising along smoothly, successfully tackling issues, bugs and launching new features at top speed. However, things began to change quickly in mid-April, when productivity took a nosedive and a pattern of inactivity during the morning hours

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The Daily 202: Ivanka Trump’s ‘consulting fees’ and Rick Gates’s book underscore depths of presidential nepotism

According to tax returns obtained by the New York Times for a story published Sunday evening, Trump himself paid nothing in federal income tax that year. Obama had reduced his tax burden for 2011 by donating $172,130 to 39 charities, and he said at the time that he believed he should be paying more in taxes. Trump reduced his tax burden to nothing by, among other things, claiming gargantuan losses on various investments.

Trump paid no federal income taxes in 11 of 18 years that the Times obtained his confidential tax filings from. In 2017, after he took office, Trump’s tax bill was only $750. It was the same in 2018.

Attacking Obama for paying 20.5 percent of his income in taxes while paying nothing himself is just the latest illustration of Trump’s hypocrisy. He campaigns as a populist but governs as a plutocrat. Now the self-proclaimed billionaire seeks a

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The daily business briefing: September 25, 2020



A vial in a lab


© ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images
A vial in a lab

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Novavax announced Thursday that it would start final-stage testing of its coronavirus vaccine candidate in the United Kingdom, with another big trial launching in the United States in October. The U.K. phase-three trial will enroll up to 10,000 people, half getting two doses of the vaccine 21 days apart, and the others receiving a placebo. Novavax is several months behind leading contenders in the race to approve a coronavirus vaccine, but its candidate proved particularly promising in early trials. It is the fifth late-stage trial by a company supported by the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed vaccine push, and the 11th worldwide. Novavax has never brought a vaccine to market but sealed a $1.6 billion deal with the federal government in July to develop its vaccine. [The New York Times]

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The Labor Department

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