Category: starting a business

A taste for travel? Finnair to sell plane food in shops

HELSINKI (AP) — Finnish carrier Finnair will start selling business class airplane food in supermarkets in a move to keep its catering staff employed and to offer a taste of the airline experience to those missing flying in the COVID-19 times.

The state-controlled airline said that in a pilot scheme the handmade meals, called “Taste of Finnair”, would initially be offered at one store as of Thursday.

The ready-made dishes include options like reindeer meatballs, Arctic char and Japanese-style teriyaki beef and are suited for Nordic and Asian palates and would cost about 10 euros ($12), Finnair Kitchen said. Finnair is one of the main airlines flying between Europe and Asia.


The move comes are airlines around the world try to employ their idled resources during the pandemic and tap into people’s desire to fly when most planes are grounded. Some are offering simulated flights, fake trips where the aircraft

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Launching A New Enterprise (After Exiting The Business You Led To Success)

When starting a new venture and knowing you will have to invest heavily into a brand or company financially, emotionally and, perhaps most importantly, with all of your time, quite simply, it has to be right. For example, it took two years after exiting The Entertainer to focus on what I wanted to embark on next. Many entrepreneurs expect a lightbulb moment, and for some, this may be the case. However, it is important to note that this isn’t always the path and certainly not the only one. If you approach your startup not as a sprint, but as a marathon, you can put in place the ideas and mindsets that will help you succeed in the long run. By ignoring the rush to market and taking a longer consideration to your prospective venture, it can very often benefit you and your brand.



a book sitting on top of a wooden fence


© Caha Capo


When I was considering

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Pfizer will start testing its coronavirus vaccine on children as young as 12, a crucial step to bringing the shot to more people



a woman in glasses looking at the camera: Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images


© Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images
Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images

  • Pfizer is expanding its massive coronavirus vaccine clinical trial, opening the study to include children as young as 12.
  • The company is poised to become the first major drugmaker to start testing a COVID-19 shot in kids in a large-scale study.
  • The New York pharma giant said it got permission to boost the study’s overall size to as many as 48,400 volunteers.
  • Pfizer broadened the study last month to include 16- and 17-year-olds as well as people with HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. 
  • While early clinical results were promising, it remains to be seen if Pfizer’s vaccine — or any other experimental shot — can prevent COVID-19.
  • Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla has said he expects data from this study before the end of October. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pfizer is setting plans to make its coronavirus vaccine

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Companies are just now starting to figure out remote work

As we move deeper into the pandemic, companies are realizing that the remote work habits that are de facto today will likely persist to become a major part of the way they work in the post-COVID world. Technology will play a big role in this new environment, but the way companies rebuild themselves around the technology may be even more important.

That was the topic of discussion at one round table during Fast Company‘s Impact Council annual meeting on June 30. The panel, moderated by Fast Company technology editor Harry McCracken, included Box CEO Aaron Levie, Visible CEO Miguel Quiroga, Threshold Ventures partner Heidi Roizen, Infoblox CEO Jesper Andersen, Pfizer chief digital and technology officer Lidia Fonseca, Emerald One CEO Laverne Council, and Vince Campisi of Raytheon Technologies.

When the pandemic began, much of the focus was on the technologies that we suddenly needed to enable working from home.

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How To Avoid A Bad Partnership In Business

Edmund Lowman is CEO of Slumber Hostel Group, a youth travel accommodation and tour experience provider in Southeast Asia.

A few years ago, I entered into what would turn out to be the worst business deal of my life. But along the way, I learned many valuable lessons on how to avoid bad partnerships.

Below are my tips for navigating business partnerships, as well what to do if you see your deal is starting to go south:

Negotiate.

The old saying, “Hindsight is 20/20,” is absolutely true. Looking back on this, we made so many mistakes that it is no surprise to me the deal went south. A few lessons to keep in mind include:

• Don’t argue with your future partners. Remember, these people aren’t your enemies. They are people you are going to presumably be doing business with for a long time. If you’re arguing and

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This Founder Had a Lot to Learn When She Moved to the U.S. She Turned It Into a Translation Business



a woman sitting on a bench: Elisabete Miranda


© Photograph by Melody Timothee
Elisabete Miranda

Elisabete Miranda had to start over again when she moved to the U.S. from Brazil in 1994. She turned what she learned about translation into a business.

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When Elisabete Miranda immigrated to the United States from Brazil in 1994, she learned how a life’s experience can get lost in translation. In Brazil, she’d been a respected serial entrepreneur and vice president of her local chamber of commerce. In the U.S., she felt like one more Latin American woman who didn’t speak the language. “When you move to another country, it’s like you become a stupid person,” she says with a laugh, recalling her first days in the States. “You have to suck it up and do what you need to do.”

What Miranda needed to do, she believed,

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How Tracee Ellis Ross’s Company Celebrates Black Beauty–a Business That’s All Too Rare



a person standing posing for the camera: Tracee Ellis Ross


© Credit: Rainer Hosch/Trunk Archive
Tracee Ellis Ross

Pattern is the hair care line she’d always wanted but no one had created–until now.

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As an entrepreneur, Tracee Ellis Ross would seem to have some clear advantages: She’s an award-winning actor, producer, and activist–and the daughter of Diana Ross. Yet her first steps into starting her own business brought her the same frustration and rage that so many founders–especially female founders–know all too well. A few years ago, Ross brought the idea for Pattern, a hair care line for curly, coily, and tight-textured hair, to her contact at her talent agency. “She made me cry,” recalls Ross. “She was like, ‘Why would anyone want hair products from you? You’re an actor.’ ” Like many entrepreneurs, Ross was motivated by her own experience: She knew, from years of trying to mold her hair to society’s idea of beauty–and damaging it

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‘2020 has been a hard slog’

Clare Muscutt, Jess and Lily Ratty, Varsa Amin
Clare Muscutt, Jess and Lily Ratty, Varsa Amin

From caravans to kitchen tables, and podcast production to pregnancy, I’ve been speaking to many women in and around the technology sector about how they have adapted to the challenges of working during the coronavirus pandemic.

Research suggests women across the world have shouldered more family and household responsibilities than men as the coronavirus pandemic continues, alongside their working lives.

And they share their inspirations, frustrations but also their optimism.

“I have a new business and a new life,” says Clare Muscutt, who lost work, her relationship and her flatmate as lockdown hit.

Wednesday is Ada Lovelace Day – an annual celebration of women working in the male-dominated science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) sectors.

And, this year, it has a very different vibe.

Varsha Amin, technology and digital skills coach, Hampshire

Initially it felt like business was paused. Confidence went.

I’ve

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Top bosses share their secrets

nine bosses
nine bosses

More jobs are being lost as Coronavirus lockdowns hit the economy.

For the jobs that remain, the question is, how to stand out as an applicant?

We ask nine top bosses for their thoughts.

Holly Tucker, founder of Not On The High Street: ‘I want to be wowed’

Holly Tucker MBE, founder of Holly & Co and Notonthehighstreet
Holly Tucker MBE, founder of Holly & Co and Notonthehighstreet

When you apply for a job with Ms Tucker, founder of online marketplace Not On The High Street, she’s looking for one thing: “Creativity.”

She says: “I want to be wowed by the application, whatever the role. I want to see the care, attention to detail and creativity in their application that I will want to see from them in their job every day.”

She suggests a handwritten letter or an imaginative design as a good starting place.

“Some of my favourite CVs have gone the extra mile and showcased

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Alaska’s Senate race rocked by leaked videos, China ties and even a dead bear

With just weeks to go before the November election, a sleeper U.S. Senate race in a deeply Republican state is starting to garner some attention.

A poll released on Sept. 28 showed Alaska Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan with a razor-thin 1 point lead over his main challenger, Al Gross, an orthopedic surgeon. 

While Gross is technically an independent, Democrats are backing him as part of the party’s efforts to gain a majority in the closely divided Senate. And their battle has been roiled by a series of controversies, including leaked videos and a dispute over an alleged bear attack. 

Senator Dan Sullivan (R-AK) speaks during a Senate Armed Services hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S. May 7, 2020. (Al Drago/Pool via reuters)
Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on May 7. (Al Drago/Pool via Reuters)

Gross, whose father was the state’s Democratic attorney general in the 1970s, has leaned on his colorful background in his effort to unseat Sullivan. His ads have described him as having been “born

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