Tag: Surge

Surge for Water and SBB Research Group to Speak at Chicago Water Week

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Over two billion people—more than a quarter of the global population—do not have access to safe water. As part of Chicago Water Week, nonprofit Surge for Water and investment firm SBB Research Group will discuss their long-term partnership to provide safe water to thousands of people in Kaberamaido, Uganda.

Shilpa Alva, executive director of Surge for Water, founded her organization in 2008 to address the global water crisis. She will be joined at Chicago Water Week by SBB Research Group’s Jordan Robinson, who has spearheaded the firm’s collaboration with Surge for Water since 2015. Their projects together have repaired wells, distributed hundreds of water filters, and provided vital educational resources, which has resulted in 1,953 people now having access to safe water in their community.

“Surge for Water has a tremendous impact on so many lives,” said Robinson. “We are proud to partner with them and look

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Scams involving online vehicle sales surge amid pandemic



a screenshot of a car: Better Business Bureau issues a warning


© Better Business Bureau
Better Business Bureau issues a warning

The old saying rings true with one of the newest online scams: “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

KETV reports the Better Business Bureau is warning about virtual vehicle vendor scams, which it says are soaring amid the pandemic.

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“Scammers are legitimately able to say that there are real reasons why you’re not able to physically come and inspect the vehicle,” said Jim Hegarty, with the Better Business Bureau.

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An in-depth investigative study by the BBB revealed thousands of consumers have fallen victim to this type of scam.

Scammers are using websites like Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace to sell people vehicles that don’t exist. Victims are often directed to pay an independent third party, typically by wire transfer, to hold money in escrow. They’ll use the names of

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Sage business survey reflects surge of optimism for 2014

What a difference a year makes. Manufacturers and distributors surveyed by Sage, a supplier of business management software, are decidedly more optimistic about the U.S. economy than they were in 2013.

“We saw a significant jump in positives from 27% to 36% in our 2014 survey,” Joe Langner, Executive Vice President, Mid-Market Solutions, told PlasticsToday. “Business is looking much stronger. Forty-two percent of respondents said that they expected production to increase over the next six months, and 46 percent said that they would invest in technology.” The fact that almost half of the respondents are planning to plow some of their profits back into the company and invest in growth is an especially heartening sign for Langner.



Image courtesy graur codrin/freedigitalphotos.net

New to the 2014 survey is a question related to reshoring, which has been the subject of much debate on the PlasticsToday site as elsewhere.

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Nike Stock Jumps Nearly 10% After Reporting Surge In Online Sales

Topline

Shares of athletic apparel retailer Nike surged by nearly 10% on Wednesday, a day after the company reported financial results that crushed expectations thanks to booming online business during the coronavirus pandemic.

Key Facts

Even as many of its stores were reopened, Nike saw digital sales jump 82% last quarter, as record numbers of customers turned to its website and app to shop for sneakers and workout apparel.

The company reported revenue of $10.6 billion, crushing analyst expectations of only  $9.15 billion, with earnings of 95 cents per share (versus 47 cents expected).

Nike said sales got a boost from parents stocking up on back-to-school items, while its women’s apparel division grew nearly 200% and business also picked back up in key markets like China. 

Nike, which has already

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Salsify nabs $155M as its commerce experience platform sees a big surge of business from Covid-19

As traditional brands grapple with a new world where selling online is as much or perhaps even more important than how you are positioned in a physical store, a startup that helps them get all their inventory, marketing and selling strategies all on one page has raised a significant round of funding.

Salsify, which provides brands and the companies behind them a single place to track product inventories, manage how they are described and sold across a disparate array of online and offline locations, and then run analytics on the data to figure out what next steps to take, has closed $155 million in a Series E round of financing led by Warburg Pincus, with other unnamed investors participating.

Jason Purcell, the CEO and co-founder who co-founded the company with Jeremy Redburn (chief data officer) and Rob Gonzalez (CMO), said the company would not be disclosing its valuation but only

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‘Pandemic entrepreneurs’ create a surge of new businesses

Another potential boost to entrepreneurship: surging home prices. While the Great Recession left many out of work and underwater on their homes, housing prices have been increasing at record rates during the pandemic. Today’s would-be entrepreneurs have a better opportunity to borrow against their equity for startup cash, or use it as a safety net if things go wrong.

“It’s an inherently risky decision to start a new business, and when your big insurance policy, your home, lost its value, you are even less likely to take that risk,” Fikri said. “But if it’s preserved, and you feel like you can fall back on it, then hey, maybe now is the time.”

Home equity may be a more important factor in boosting business creation nationwide than in Philadelphia: About half of all homes in the city are owner-occupied, compared to nearly two-thirds nationally.

There’s also the fact that the pandemic’s

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Walmart, UPS and others are staffing up for an online shopping surge this holiday season

The upcoming holiday shopping stretch will look much different for retailers in a pandemic.

Instead of preparing for door-busters on Black Friday and frenzied shopping in stores before Christmas, many retailers and shipping companies are beginning to staff up in anticipation of a flood of online delivery and curbside pickup orders.

Walmart, which has already hired more than 500,000 workers in stores and across its supply chain since March to meet growing demand in the pandemic, said Wednesday that it will hire more than 20,000 seasonal workers in e-commerce fulfillment centers across the country “to prepare for an expected increase in online shopping.” Walmart has stores every year that bring on seasonal associates, according to a spokesperson, but the last time Walmart hired a “large number of seasonal associates” was in 2015, when Walmart added 60,000 holiday workers for stores.

Other companies are also preparing for the online shopping rush

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Main Street Shops Aren’t Ready for E-Commerce Surge, Visa Says

A UPS Worldport Facility Ahead Of Earnings Figures

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Many consumers will ignore brick-and-mortar stores this holiday season in favor of online shopping, a new study finds, and small business may end up left behind.

After months of retail turmoil and economic shutdowns due to the pandemic, about a quarter of small shops say they’re now unprepared for an influx of sales this holiday season, according to a report from Visa Inc. This year promises to be especially unusual, with more than half of consumers planning to do most of their shopping online.

“There’s not a lot of time left” for small businesses to prepare, said Kevin Phalen, Visa’s global head of business solutions. Many are “not online, they’re not e-commerce enabled and they haven’t thought through their payment capabilities.”

Major retailers from U.S. electronics chain Best Buy Co. to Spanish fast-fashion giant Inditex SA have spent the past several months building up

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I’d Buy This Cheap Stock Today! I Reckon Its Share Price Could Still Surge In September

Demand for shares on British stock indices remains extremely weakw. The FTSE 100, for instance has made fractional gains only in September. And this follows a summer during which prices of UK shares on the Footsie retrated in value

There’s a number of factors that could keep demand for UK shares in the gutter. Rising Covid-19 infection rates, and disappointing news on the hunt for a vaccine are the most obvious. Rising trade tensions between the US and other major economies are another, whilst rising civil unrest in the States and heightened political uncertainty in Washington provide reason to be pessimistic.

Throw a rocky Brexit process into the mix, too and there’s clearly plenty of reason why demand for UK shares could remain quite pathetic. The possibility of another stock market crash can’t be ruled out, either. But that doesn’t mean that all British stocks are in danger of

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Amazon hiring more than 600 in the Lehigh Valley to keep up with online shopping surge

If you had to guess, amid the economic chaos, about the companies actually hiring during the coronavirus pandemic, what would come to mind? Maybe you’d think of the surge in online ordering, or glance out the window to see a blue Mercedes-Benz delivery van with the word “prime” next to a familiar logo.



In the Lehigh Valley, Amazon operates fulfillment centers in Breinigsville (650 and 705 Boulder Drive) and in Palmer Township, 1610 Van Buren Road.


© rnDavid McNew/ rn/The Morning Call/TNS
In the Lehigh Valley, Amazon operates fulfillment centers in Breinigsville (650 and 705 Boulder Drive) and in Palmer Township, 1610 Van Buren Road.

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Amazon on Monday announced it would hire 100,000 full- and part-time employees across its fulfillment network in the United States and Canada to meet online ordering demand. That hiring binge includes more than 600 new jobs in the Lehigh Valley, with several hundred openings each at Amazon’s fulfillment centers in Upper Macungie Township and in Palmer Township, spokesperson Rachael Lighty said.

Amazon already employs about

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