Tag: Supreme

Supreme Court hearing major cases involving Google, Oracle and Ford

A man with the pro-life organization Bound4Life raises his hands in prayer outside of the U.S. Supreme Court on October 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. With 8 justices currently on the bench, the Supreme Court begins a new term on Monday.

Drew Angerer | Getty Images

The political spotlight is shining brightly on the Supreme Court as the Senate weighs the nomination of President Donald Trump’s nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, but on Wednesday, the court will be all business. 

Three giants of industry — Google, Oracle and Ford — will press their cases before the justices in a pair of disputes that are expected to have broad impacts on American businesses and consumers. Decisions are expected by the end of June. 

The arguments come in the first week of the court’s 2020 term and will be heard virtually as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. They are among the

Read More

Why a more conservative Supreme Court is bad for small business

  • On Oct. 7, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case involving Ford and whether victims of alleged car defects can sue the auto manufacturer in states outside its home state.
  • Concerns about an even more conservative Court if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed do not often center on a conservative leaning towards big corporations. 
  • If Ford prevails, it may be the first of many big, future losses for small businesses, writes Sarah Crozier of small business advocate Main Street Alliance. 
  • Forty state attorneys general are arguing against the auto company’s position.



a large wooden bench in front of a building: An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her

Read More

Supreme Court allows minor leaguers’ class action over pay

The Supreme Court is allowing a class-action lawsuit to proceed from minor league baseball players who allege they are being paid less than minimum wage.

The lawsuit involves minor league players in Arizona, California and Florida. The justices offered no comment Monday in rejecting Major League Baseball’s appeal.

The players first sued major league teams in February 2014, claiming most earn less than $7,500 annually in violation of several laws. A judge had initially allowed only the California players to sue, but the federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled in favor of the players from Arizona and Florida.

“The Supreme Court’s decision to let the class certification decision stand is great news for minor league players,” said Korein Tillery LLC, the firm representing the players. “After almost four years on appeal, the players can now return to the trial court to ensure that Major League Baseball and team

Read More

Why a more conservative Supreme Court may be bad for small business

An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Collection of the Supreme Court | Reuters

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her seat open to a contentious fight that could remake the Supreme Court for generations to come — as well as Main Street.

A case this week exemplifies the wonky, under-the-radar policy changes that could have major implications for small businesses, who are pinned against corporations that the conservative majority has all too frequently favored. Yet this case has an atypical showing of more than 40 state attorneys general lined up in support of small business, a unique yet critical alliance that is appropriately warning the court of the significant consequences an

Read More

Coronavirus complicates Senate’s Supreme Court fight



a person standing in a room: This week: Coronavirus complicates Senate's Supreme Court fight


© Getty Images
This week: Coronavirus complicates Senate’s Supreme Court fight

The coronavirus is adding a dose of uncertainty into the Senate’s fight over President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Republicans have laid out an ambitious timeline to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court that’s left them only days to spare before the Nov. 3 election and no room for surprises.

The party now finds itself with six members absent this week – three because they tested positive for coronavirus and three who are working remotely due to potential exposure – capping the 53-seat GOP majority at 47 members for at least a week.

Loading...

Load Error

Complicating matters further, four of the six are members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, responsible for Barrett’s hearing and sending her nomination to the floor. Sens. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) announced Friday that they had tested positive, while Sens.

Read More

Ally petitions U.S. Supreme Court to dissolve class action

To dissolve the class, Ally is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that failure to comply with the Uniform Commercial Code on a national level is not a valid claim because the laws pertaining to the code don’t align perfectly across the states. The argument is a strong one, according to attorney Aaron Jacoby, chair of the auto industry practice group at Arent Fox law firm. Jacoby said it would destabilize similarity in the applicable law, one of the three components necessary to certify a class. Jacoby and the law firm are not involved in the case.

A failure to comply with the code in one state, or even one instance, “doesn’t mean every one of your repossessions was wrong,” Jacoby said.

If the Supreme Court were to side with the class, the case would proceed with merits, a period of discovery and then trial. From there, it could

Read More

The Finance 202: Big business eyes more wins with padded conservative majority on Supreme Court

Yet the court is also primed to rule on a slate of issues pitting big-business interests against consumers and workers – with sweeping consequences for the balance of power between them. 

This court already treats business interests more favorably than any in nearly a century, some scholars argue. In its 2017 term, the court returned pro-business decisions in more than 80 percent of the cases in which they were at stake, according to an analysis by Adam Feldman, author of the Empirical SCOTUS blog.

That was before Brett Kavanaugh replaced Anthony Kennedy on the court, advancing the court’s rightward shift. Trump’s pick is primed to cement that evolution. Per Feldman’s analysis, the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the least business-friendly justice from 2015 through 2017:

Adding another justice likely to side with the corporate agenda, public-interest lawyers who argue before the court say, will make it harder for consumer and

Read More