Tag: Execs

Are Kanye West’s Ideas About the Music Industry Really That Unthinkable? Label Execs Weigh in

While Kanye West’s recent Twitter binges, in which he calls for a drastic overhaul of recording contracts, commanded the music industry’s attention, there was a difference in tone for the missives posted Sept. 19-21 to the more volatile ones of a few days earlier.

The tweets shared Sept. 15-16, in which West exposed more than 100 pages of his various contract amendments, evoked the mid-‘90s chapter when Prince sought to obtain the rights to his master recordings from Warner Bros. Records. While still demanding new business practices, West’s more recent batch of tweets and a subsequent interview with Billboard revealed a more collegial tone, suggesting his vision for a more artist-friendly industry will benefit labels and publishers, too.

In a Sept. 21 post that showed photos of senior Universal Music Group executives, West identified them as people who “are all going to be my best friends some day,” whereas earlier

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CPA business execs plan to retain office space, but still allow remote work

Most companies don’t expect to reduce their office space in the coming year, but at the same time they plan to retain the remote work options put in place in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, according to a survey of CPAs who work as CEOs, CFOs, controllers and other executive leadership positions at companies.

The survey, by the American Institute of CPAs, found that 82 percent of the business executives polled said their companies would not be reducing office space in the year ahead, while 22 percent said they plan to have mainly remote operations in the next 12 months.

The third-quarter AICPA Economic Outlook Survey found that approximately half of the 1,067 respondents said their companies plan to return principally or entirely to traditional onsite operations, provided restrictions are eased or not in place. Another 15 percent said remote work was never an option for them. Nine percent

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Pandemic Challenges Companies to Master Customer Signals, Oracle Execs Say at Cloud CX Virtual Summit

Companies shifting their customer service agents to remote locations amid the COVID-19 pandemic needed, and still need, to master customer signals Oracle executives said at the Oracle Cloud CX Virtual Summit today.

“There was a massive disruption in business,” said Rob Tarkoff, executive vice president of the Oracle CX and Data Cloud. “The shift happened in days, not months.”

The shift created several questions for contact center operators: How to support employees who were suddenly remote? How to conduct business-to-business meetings that had previously been done in person? How to interact with customers in the changed economy where jobless claims were running in the millions.

For contact center operators, that meant it was essential to master customer signals, Tarkoff told the online audience. “We needed to be authentic. We don’t know what the new normal will look like. We also needed to be more empathetic with customers.”

For Oracle, the

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business travelers. Execs are hoping wealthy vacationers can make up the difference.



a group of people posing for the camera: Private aviation is at a crossroads following a busy summer for leisure travel and executives are waiting to see if business travel rebounds in the fall. XOJET; FXAIR; Silver Air; Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; Flexjet; Samantha Lee/Business Insider


© XOJET; FXAIR; Silver Air; Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; Flexjet; Samantha Lee/B…
Private aviation is at a crossroads following a busy summer for leisure travel and executives are waiting to see if business travel rebounds in the fall. XOJET; FXAIR; Silver Air; Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; Flexjet; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

  • Private aviation executives say the industry has succeeded in gaining back most of the business lost to the pandemic but the recovery isn’t yet complete.
  • Private jet travel bounced back in the summer after some firms booked no flights at all in late March and April with the fall looking similarly promising thanks to a new market of leisure flyers.
  • Firms are moving to capture as much of the new market as possible by scaling up, adopting advanced scheduling and pricing systems, and enhancing safety protocols. 
  • Business Insider spoke with eight private aviation executives to learn
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