Tag: dont

More Than 70% of Students Who Fear Lower Grades Due to Online Learning Don’t Always Have Internet Access

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seventy-one percent (71%) of students who expect lower grades than usual while learning remotely don’t always have access to high-speed internet, according to a new report from The Manifest, a business how-to and news website.

The survey accounts for 400 high school and college students’ impressions on remote learning in the fall 2020 semester.

Internet access is essential for students to attend classes, submit assignments, and collaborate with classmates. Students with limited access have already started to fall behind in class.

Accessibility disproportionately challenges Black, Latino, and Native American students, as well as those living in rural areas. Academic achievement gaps resulting from a lack of internet access will most severely impact these groups.

Students Expected to Purchase Expensive Back-to-School Tech Equipment

Expensive technological equipment is another barrier to entry for disadvantaged students participating in remote learning.

Students will need to

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Leaked memo promises penalties for Trump officials who don’t stop diversity trainings

  • A memo written on Monday by Office of Management and Budget Director Russell Vought directs heads of federal departments and agencies to take “immediate and substantive action” to implement an executive order by President Donald Trump putting an end to diversity and race-related trainings.
  • The memo leaked to Insider warns of penalties for officials who don’t abide by the president’s orders to end the trainings, which the White House has described as “divisive.”
  • Trump signed an executive order on September 22 that blasted several government diversity training programs as “malign ideology” from the “fringes of American society.”
  • The directives come on the heels of protests against racial injustice across the country that have continued for months and prompted a reckoning with the treatment of Black people and other racial minorities.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Federal officials could be penalized if their agencies and departments don’t take “immediate

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Trump Jr on father’s taxes: ‘People don’t understand what goes into a business’

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump’s reported 0 income tax payments Ocasio-Cortez: Trump contributed less in taxes ‘than waitresses and undocumented immigrants’ Third judge orders Postal Service to halt delivery cuts MORE’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., is pushing back on a recent bombshell story published by The New York Times that reported his father paid no income taxes for 10 of the 15 years that preceded his winning the presidency, and $750 in tax in 2016 and 2017.

Trump Jr. defended his father  during an appearance on “Fox & Friends” on Monday, a day after the Times published its report, claiming the president, who was a real-estate mogul and television personality prior to his election in 2016 and is currently a billionaire, according to Forbes, has paid “tens of millions of taxes.” 

“People don’t understand what goes into a business,” Trump Jr. said,

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Issues You Think You Need to Worry About as a New Business Owner (But Don’t)

As a new business owner, you want to set yourself and your company up for success. But with so many different tasks to do and factors to weigh, you might not know what to prioritize. Focusing on the wrong areas can be a waste of your time and energy at best, and at worst, a detriment to your growing business.

To help you avoid that pitfall, we spoke to a group of experienced business owners about their entrepreneurial experiences and what they’ve learned along the way. Below, they share seven things new entrepreneurs tend to put too much weight on when they first start out — and what they should focus on instead.

1. Adding new services

According to Eric Mathews, founder and CEO of Start Co., entrepreneurship is the art of subtraction, not addition. However, many new entrepreneurs focus on adding new features, product lines, people and markets on

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Is it insane to start a business during coronavirus? Millions of Americans don’t think so

The 22-year-old in Haviland, Kan., opened Lela’s Bakery and Coffeehouse on Sept. 12, naming it after her grandmother. It has been busy every day since, she said. “It just felt like the right thing to do,” Ms. Schneider said.

Americans are starting new businesses at the fastest rate in more than a decade, according to government data, seizing on pent-up demand and new opportunities after the pandemic shut down and reshaped the economy.

Applications for the employer identification numbers that entrepreneurs need to start a business have passed 3.2 million so far this year, compared with 2.7 million at the same point in 2019, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That group includes gig-economy workers and other independent contractors who may have struck out on their own after being laid off.

Roaring back

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Roaring back

Even excluding those applicants, new filings among a subset of business owners who tend

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Is It Insane to Start a Business During Coronavirus? Millions of Americans Don’t Think So.

The pandemic forced hundreds of thousands of small businesses to close. For Madison Schneider, it was a good time to start a new one.

The 22-year-old in Haviland, Kan., opened Lela’s Bakery and Coffeehouse on Sept. 12, naming it after her grandmother. It has been busy every day since, she said. “It just felt like the right thing to do,” Ms. Schneider said.

Americans are starting new businesses at the fastest rate in more than a decade, according to government data, seizing on pent-up demand and new opportunities after the pandemic shut down and reshaped the economy.

Madison Schneider takes an order at her new business, Lela’s Bakery & Coffeehouse, in Haviland, Kan. It opened on September 12.



Photo:

Shane Brown for The Wall Street Journal

Applications for the employer identification numbers that entrepreneurs need to start a business have passed 3.2 million so far this year, compared with 2.7

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What You Don’t Know About Your Healthcare Plan is Costing You


As a business owner, you might find yourself caught between two core principles: the responsibility to ensure the wellbeing of your employees and the need to protect your bottom line. The good news is, the two aren’t mutually exclusive: It’s absolutely possible to provide a top-notch health care plan that also maximizes your savings. First, start by answering one question: Do you know much your organization spent on health care costs last year?


Even if you don’t know the exact number, you might already be aware that you’re paying too much. According to a survey conducted by Enterprise Bank and Trust, 79% of business owners are concerned about health care costs, and for good reason. Being unaware of how much your health benefits plan

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‘Don’t do it’: studies flash sub-zero rate warnings to central banks

LONDON (Reuters) – Six years after the ECB cut interest rates below 0%, behavioural finance gurus have a message for other central banks thinking about taking the plunge: don’t.

FILE PHOTO: The European Central Bank logo. Frankfurt, Germany, January 23, 2020. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo

Rates in the United States, Britain, Norway, Australia, New Zealand, Israel and Canada are at or below 0.25%, so chances are one or more of their central banks will go sub-zero to try and counter the pandemic-fuelled economic funk.

Money markets are pricing in the Bank of England making the move in 2021 while New Zealand’s central bank has already asked banks to prepare for negative rates.

New studies however seem to reinforce what some policymakers have long feared — negative rates are ineffectual and perhaps even counterproductive.

“If your goal is to motivate people to take on more leverage (debt) and to increase investments in

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‘Don’t Do It’: Studies Flash Sub-Zero Rate Warnings to Central Banks | Investing News

LONDON (Reuters) – Six years after the ECB cut interest rates below 0%, behavioural finance gurus have a message for other central banks thinking about taking the plunge: don’t.

Rates in the United States, Britain, Norway, Australia, New Zealand, Israel and Canada are at or below 0.25%, so chances are one or more of their central banks will go sub-zero to try and counter the pandemic-fuelled economic funk.

Money markets are pricing in the Bank of England making the move in 2021 while New Zealand’s central bank has already asked banks to prepare for negative rates.

New studies however seem to reinforce what some policymakers have long feared — negative rates are ineffectual and perhaps even counterproductive.

“If your goal is to motivate people to take on more leverage (debt) and to increase investments in risky assets, then zero interest rates are actually more efficient than negative rates,” said Lior

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Don’t waste your cash on the National Lottery. I’d buy cheap UK shares in an ISA to get rich

Investing modest sums of money in cheap UK shares on a regular basis could lead to a surprisingly large ISA return over the long run. The stock market’s low valuation and recovery potential mean it could provide a wide range of investors with a nest egg from which to enjoy financial freedom in older age.



a man and a woman sitting on a boat: Happy retired couple on a yacht


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Happy retired couple on a yacht

Therefore, instead of trying to win the National Lottery, now may be the right time to start investing in British stocks. They could make a far more positive impact on your financial outlook.

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Investing regularly in cheap UK shares

Many investors may be dissuaded from buying cheap UK shares because they only have modest amounts of spare cash. While this may have been a problem many years ago due to the cost of buying stocks, today the stock market is accessible

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