Tag: Debt

FTS International Announces Amended RSA, Launch of Comprehensive Prepackaged Restructuring Plan with the Support of 87.55% of Secured Debt Claims

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FTS International, Inc. (NYSE American: FTSI) (“FTSI” or the “Company”) today announced that it has entered into a second amended and restated restructuring support agreement (the “RSA”) with creditors holding approximately 87.55% of the principal amount outstanding of the company’s secured debt (collectively, the “Consenting Creditors”) and intends to file voluntary cases under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas on September 22, 2020 (the “Court”).

To implement the restructuring set forth in the RSA, the Company commenced solicitation of votes on the Company’s prepackaged chapter 11 plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) from the holders of the Company’s 6.250% senior secured notes due 2022 (the “Secured Notes”) and the Company’s term loan facility (the “Term Loan”). The Company intends to commence solicitation of votes from the

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Google will now help US employees pay off student loan debt

  • Google will help employees pay off their student loans beginning in 2021. 
  • The company announced Thursday that it will match up to $2,500 per employee per year, beginning with Googlers in the US. 
  • The student loan crisis in the US disproportionately affects Black borrowers, who are likely to be saddled with more debt than white borrowers. Employee groups for Black Googlers helped bring the new program to fruition, CNBC reports. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google is going to start helping its employees pay off their student loans, the company announced Thursday. 

Beginning in 2021, Google will match up to $2,500 in loan payments per employee each year, beginning with US employees and expanding to its global workforce in the future. According to CNBC, the program will only be available to full-time employees, not contractors or temporary workers. 

Google said the goal of the program is to help

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What to Do if You’re Approaching Retirement With Credit Card Debt

Too many people are letting credit card debt eat away at their retirement dreams.

Going into retirement debt-free is ideal, but unfortunately, it isn’t always possible. According to a study on credit card debt statistics done by The Ascent, the people with the most credit card debt are those aged 50 to 59 — just years from retirement age.

With the high interest rates on credit cards, carrying that debt into retirement can mean drastically less disposable income when you need it most. It can even mean drawing from your retirement accounts at a faster rate than planned and potentially running out of money. If you’re nearing retirement age with credit card debt, here’s how to get on top of the situation.

Focus on high-interest debt first

Your first priority should be paying off high-interest debt — an interest rate above 7% — such as credit card debt.

While it

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How To Pay Off $100K in Credit Card Debt

Paying off debt, whether it’s a big credit card balance or a personal loan, doesn’t just happen overnight. Instead, it’s something most people work toward for many months and years.

For Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, The Money Coach® and author of “Zero Debt: The Ultimate Guide to Financial Freedom,” it took nearly three years — and a lot of self-discipline — until she paid off a whopping $100,000 in credit card debt.

“I used credit as a crutch and as a lifestyle tool,” Khalfani-Cox tells CNBC Select. “When I didn’t have money for something, I whipped out a credit card.”

When Khalfani-Cox reached her early 30s, she started getting declined for purchases and new credit because her credit cards were maxed out. It was then that she realized her debt was a big problem.

She soon made it a point to finally get rid of her high balances and use her credit

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Five Strategies To Manage Debt When You’ve Lost Revenue

Dean Kaplan is President of The Kaplan Group. He writes about business debt collection, contract negotiations and provides financial advice.

If your company is in trouble, you are not alone. The current health crisis has caused businesses of all sizes to suffer. You may have loans you took out in better times that now seem unpayable. Or, you may owe money to vendors.

Fortunately, managing your debt when you’ve lost revenue is difficult, but doable.

1. Improve your cash flow with earlier payments.

Right now, it’s a difficult time to increase your customer base or revenue. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t get more money flowing in faster.

If you have customers already on a month-to-month automatic payment plan, see if you can convert them to paying for a year in advance. Depending on the interest rates of your loans, it may be worth offering a significant

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Private equity’s risky cheap debt move

There are not many winners from Covid-19. The pandemic has wreaked havoc with most companies’ balance sheets and upset business plans everywhere. Yet for one group of investors, there is a silver lining in the cloud that is coronavirus. Private equity groups are taking advantage of soaring demand for corporate debt by loading the companies they own with even more borrowing and using the fresh loans to pay themselves big dividends.

By the middle of this month, almost 24 per cent of money raised in the US loan market had been used to fund dividends to private equity owners. This was up from an average of less than 4 per cent over the past two years. The surge in so-called dividend recapitalisations has, rightly, rung alarm bells among finance watchers.

Even before Covid-19, companies had taken on unprecedented levels of debt. Combined with the near-total lockdowns that brought most economic

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FTS International Announces Amended RSA, Launch of Comprehensive Prepackaged Restructuring Plan with the Support of 87.55% of Secured Debt Claims | Region

FORT WORTH, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 21, 2020–

FTS International, Inc. (NYSE American: FTSI) (“FTSI” or the “Company”) today announced that it has entered into a second amended and restated restructuring support agreement (the “RSA”) with creditors holding approximately 87.55% of the principal amount outstanding of the company’s secured debt (collectively, the “Consenting Creditors”) and intends to file voluntary cases under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas on September 22, 2020 (the “Court”).

To implement the restructuring set forth in the RSA, the Company commenced solicitation of votes on the Company’s prepackaged chapter 11 plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) from the holders of the Company’s 6.250% senior secured notes due 2022 (the “Secured Notes”) and the Company’s term loan facility (the “Term Loan”). The Company intends to commence solicitation of votes from the Company’s existing equity interests following a “first-day”

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Visa’s Debt Overview | Benzinga

Over the past three months, shares of Visa (NYSE: V) moved higher by 2.48%. Before having a look at the importance of debt, let us look at how much debt Visa has.

Visa’s Debt

Based on Visa’s financial statement as of July 31, 2020, long-term debt is at $17.88 billion and current debt is at $3.00 billion, amounting to $20.88 billion in total debt. Adjusted for $13.90 billion in cash-equivalents, the company’s net debt is at $6.98 billion.

Shareholders look at the debt-ratio to understand how much financial leverage a company has. Visa has $77.88 billion in total assets, therefore making the debt-ratio 0.27. As a rule of thumb, a debt-ratio more than one indicates that a considerable portion of debt is funded by assets. A higher debt-ratio can also imply that the company might be putting itself at risk for default, if interest rates were to increase. However, debt-ratios

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Yes government debt is cheap, but that doesn’t mean it comes risk-free

The financial response of Western governments to the COVID-19 crisis has been gargantuan, with boosts to health expenditure, enhanced JobSeeker-like payments, and JobKeeper-like wage subsidies to keep workers attached to jobs.

While a strong response has been necessary, it has come with costs.

These have been huge budget deficits and sky-high government debt.

The International Monetary Fund is expecting global budget deficits of around 14% of world gross domestic product this year, up from 4% last year, and almost three times the peaked reached after the global financial crisis.

Additionally, governments are providing the same amount again in “off-balance sheet” support, most notably loans to banks, and government guarantees for bank loans.

To the extent these off-balance sheet loans become contingent liabilities of governments and are not repaid, they will add more to government debt.

Global gross public debt was already high before the crisis, at about 80% of one

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DexCom: A Superior Business Model But Watch Out For Debt Level (NASDAQ:DXCM)

DexCom’s (NASDAQ: DXCM) success can be attributed to the rapid adoption by the diabetic community of its innovative continuous glucose monitoring (“CGM”) system.

This disposable device worn on the body continuously downloads the patient’s blood sugar to a smartphone and therefore provides patients with a convenient way to track their blood sugar levels in real time, which helps in better managing the disease.

DexCom’s share price has been on a steep uptrend and currently trades at two times March lows. Moreover, there has been a recent dip to the $385-390 levels, leaving investors wondering as to whether this constitutes a buying opportunity.

Figure 1: Share price evolution

ChartData by YCharts

I will answer this question by scanning through the CGM market as well as analyzing the medical device manufacturer’s business model, highlighting the positives but also paying close attention to competitive positioning and challenges going forward.

The market for diabetes

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