Tag: Buffetts

Why Warren Buffett’s Protege Just Bought This Dirt-Cheap Brick-and-Mortar Retailer

Looks as if one of Warren Buffett’s two younger lieutenants at Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK-A) (NYSE:BRK-B) just made a la.rge deep-value investment. Ted Wechsler, who joined Berkshire in 2011, recently disclosed that he had personally bought 1.08 million shares of Dillard’s (NYSE:DDS), the beleaguered department store, good for 5.89% of its outstanding shares. We don’t know exactly when Wechsler had been buying, though we do know that he crossed the 5% mark on Sept 29, necessitating a filing. Of note, Wechsler made this purchase personally, and not as part of Berkshire’s equity portfolio.

Dillard’s had seen relatively lackluster business even before COVID-19 hit, which caused an even bigger drop in sales. Moreover, the company was removed from the S&P MidCap 400 Index in June, as its market cap plunged below $1 billion after the stock has fallen a whopping 43% this year.

So what has Wechsler believing Dillard’s is a

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Warren Buffett’s charity dinner spurred the boss of an online-trading platform to embrace value investing


  • Cryptocurrency entrepreneur Justin Sun paid $4.6 million for a charity dinner with Warren Buffett in January.
  • Sun hoped to convert Buffett into a Bitcoin fan, but instead one of his guests, eToro CEO Yoni Assia, embraced Buffett’s value-investing approach.
  • Assia read the definitive book on the subject written by Buffett’s mentor, hired a value-investing consultant, and became a bigger proponent of in-depth research and longer investment horizons, Bloomberg reported.
  • The boss of the social-trading platform also tweeted that value investing is a “hidden magic that reveals itself to you only after 20 years of making 15-20% and compounding it.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Cryptocurrency executive Justin Sun shelled out $4.6 million for a charity dinner with Warren Buffett in a vain attempt to convert the billionaire investor into a Bitcoin believer. Instead, one of his guests embraced Buffett’s signature value-investing strategy, Bloomberg reported on

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Incoming CEO of Warren Buffett’s railroad Katie Farmer on the economy

Katie Farmer, incoming CEO of BNSF Railway, told CNBC on Friday that her industry has clearly been impacted economically by the coronavirus pandemic, but there’s optimism on the horizon.

“We have seen the economy start to pick up relative to rail loadings,” Farmer told “Squawk Box.”

While BNSF, owned by Warren Buffett-led Berkshire Hathaway, anticipates a rebound, Farmer noted this year has been different from the past.

“We basically say that if we’re handling 200,000 units of wheat, that indicates we’re a busy railroad,” she explained. “In 2018, we handled over 200,000 units of wheat, 41 times that year. Fast forward to 2020 and with the impact of the pandemic, we haven’t hit 200,000 units on our railroads yet.”

“In the depth of the pandemic, our rail loadings were actually down to about 150,000 units a week. Now, we have seen that continue to come back. And we anticipate this

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Cheap UK shares: I’d follow Warren Buffett’s strategy to get rich

Warren Buffett is well known for his love of “buying quality merchandise when it is marked down.” I think he’d be interested in both of the cheap UK shares I’m going to look at today.

Both companies operate in the insurance sector, which is where Buffett made his fortune. Insurers are out of favour in the UK at the moment, but recent news suggests to me that investors can look forward to improving performance and some high dividend yields.

Covid claims cut

My first pick is commercial and general insurance group Hiscox (LSE: HSX). The firm is one of eight UK insurers which took part in a legal test case to clarify whether it should pay out on business interruption claims relating to the coronavirus lockdown.

The High Court has now released its judgement on this case — apparently it’s “more than 160 pages”.

What we need to know

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Warren Buffett’s $300,000 Haircut Reveals a Brutal Truth About Success Few People Are Willing to Admit

According to Alice Schroeder’s The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, a young Buffett was sometimes heard muttering things to himself like, “Do I really want to spend $300,000 for this haircut?” (H/t to this Wall Street Journal article by Jason Zweig.)

Warren Buffett obviously never spent $300,000 on a haircut. The remark instead refers to the power of compound earnings over time, something Buffett later called “The Methuselah Technique”: The financial advantages of a long life, a high rate of return, and as Buffett wrote in his 1965 Buffett Partnership letter, “a combination of both (especially recommended by this author.”)

Of course he’s right: Where building wealth is concerned, time is your friend. Say you invest $5,000 and receive a relatively conservative 6 percent return. Over time, here’s are the gains on that $5,000:

Clearly time is your friend. But while money spent today is money that

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